Ideas & Innovation

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Fighting cybercrime. Building cars that drive themselves. Using big data and satellite mapping to help the most vulnerable populations survive heat waves. These are just a few examples of innovative research taking place at Indiana University.

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The pharmaceutical and biotech industries are not suited to do the kind of experimental work that a university can do—pure exploration, the sorts of crazy things that make other people say, ‘That just won’t work.’ And most times, it doesn’t. But it’s those few successes that constitute the breakthroughs we must have to make progress.

—Richard DiMarchi, Distinguished Professor; Linda and Jack Gill Chair in Biomolecular Sciences

Visionary Research

Description of the video:

Ideas and Innovations Transcript

[Music begins]

[Video: IU Banner appears top center]

[Words Appear: Indiana University Foundation]

[Words Appear: An estimated 10 million Americans are blind or visually impaired. —National Federation of the Blind]

[Words Appear: Their ability to use technology will determine their educational and occupational success.]

[Words Appear: Researchers at Indiana University are meeting this challenge head-on.]

[Video: Close-up headshot of Chris Meyer sitting in a windowless office with beige walls. Directly behind him is a large green potted plant, behind him and to the left sits a black Dell computer monitor, behind him and to the right is a white dry erase board covered in green markings.]

[Words Appear next to an IU banner at the bottom left of the screen: Chris Meyer BS’16; Research Assistant, IU School of Informatics and Computing, IUPUI]

Chris Meyer: The blind and visually impaired across the world have gained a lot from our digital advances,

[Video: An over-the-shoulder close-up photograph of a blonde man wearing noise cancelling headphones and interacting with a white and grey braille keyboard on his desktop. Directly above the braille keyboard is an open black laptop.]

Chris Meyer: and have really enjoyed a lot of opportunities,

[Video: An extreme close-up photograph of a person operating an audio book player for the visually impaired with their left hand.]

Chris Meyer: through the technology that has

[Video: A close-up photograph of a woman gazing through a pair of eyeglasses and into a vision assistance headset, a white visor-like device that protrudes from her forehead.]

[Video: Close-up headshot of Chris Meyer sitting in a windowless office with beige walls. Directly behind him is a large green potted plant, behind him and to the left sits a black Dell computer monitor, behind him and to the right is a white dry erase board covered in green markings.]

Chris Meyer: turned our world into ones and zeroes, to little pieces of data, but a lot of times the world isn't designed for blind people.

[Video: Close-up headshot of Davide Bolchini, sitting in a windowless office with beige walls. Behind him in the background are two black Dell computer monitors.]

Davide Bolchini: The overall line of research, I like to call it how we can navigate the aural web.

[Words appear next to an IU Banner at the bottom left of the screen: Davide Bolchini, Ph.D.; Chair and Associate Professor, Department of Human-Centered Computing]

Davide Bolchini: So how we can help the blind individual interact with the web in a way which is mainly based on their auditory senses. So, the blind has this outstanding ability

[Video: A photograph of a blonde man in a black t-shirt wearing noise-cancellation headphones sits in a gray-walled cube. On the desk in front of him is a black keyboard attached by a power cable into a closed black laptop.

Davide Bolchini: to listen to text at very high speech rate.

[Video: A medium two-shot of Davide Bolchini and Chris Meyer sitting side-by-side in chairs in a windowless office with beige walls. Behind them in the background are two black Dell computer monitors, a green potted plant, and a white dry-erase board covered with green markings.]

Davide Bolchini: I think Chris can listen to text to up to 400 words per minute, something like that, right?

Chris Meyer: Yeah, around 450.

Davide Bolchini: 450

[Video: A close-up of Davide Bolchini sitting in a windowless office with beige walls. Behind him sit two black Dell computer monitors.]

Davide Bolchini: Which means, it means a lot. When he listens to text, I cannot understand exactly what he listening, but he's actually listening one of my papers maybe, but I really can't tell. So, this outstanding ability's underutilized in navigating web interfaces. Web interfaces, we are still working on the paradigm of

[Video: A medium two-shot of Davide Bolchini and Chris Meyer sitting side-by-side in chairs in a windowless office with beige walls. Behind them in the background are two black Dell computer monitors, a green potted plant, and a white dry-erase board covered with green markings.]

Davide Bolchini: connecting one page to the other.

[Video: An extreme close-up of a man wearing black-rimmed glasses. Reflections from a computer screen move across his lenses.]

Davide Bolchini: It's a very page-by-page navigation.

[Video: Over-the-shoulder close-up shot of a man in a white t-shirt swiping through a series of bar graphs on an iPad.]

Davide Bolchini: But for the blind, the pages do not exist.

[Video: An over-the-shoulder shot of a red-bearded man wearing a red, long-sleeved button-up shirt. He’s sitting in front of a desktop computer monitor, navigating through a social media profile by using a mouse.]

Davide Bolchini: The notion of page is very visual.

[Video: A close-up of Davide Bolchini sitting in a windowless office with beige walls. Behind him sit two black Dell computer monitors.]

Davide Bolchini: And so how we can reconstitute the element of navigation in a website without relying on the notion of page. We have to rely on content, on information, on topics.

[Words appear: Davide and Chris are working together at IU to design solutions for listening-based web navigation…]

[Words appear: …and for “screenless” navigation that will address mobility challenges blind people face every day.]

[Video: A medium two-shot of Davide Bolchini and Chris Meyer sitting side-by-side in chairs in a windowless office with beige walls. Behind them in the background are two black Dell computer monitors, a green potted plant, and a white dry-erase board covered with green markings.]

Davide Bolchini: Imagine, so the scenario, which, instead of having to take out your phone, stop what you are doing, and searching for the bus stop, or searching for things you have to go buy at the grocery, you keep your phone in your pocket, you still have your cane, and you start navigating using simple hand gestures.
[Video: Exterior view of a brown brick building. A young man with a goatee wearing a purple shirt and jeans walks toward the camera. He has ear buds in his ears that connect to a device in his pocket. On his right forearm is a black band. The words “Binary Division of Content” appear in a black shaded rectangle to the left of the man. Beneath the words “Binary Division of Content” are five smaller words: Calendar, Book, Phone, Music and Yelp. A blue triangle hovers over the word “phone.” The man makes a gesture with his right hand toward the onscreen text. The blue triangle moves from Phone to Music to Yelp.]

Davide Bolchini: You can navigate forward, backward, you can select

[Video: Cut to a close-up of the black band on the man’s forearm. Laid over his hand, which is making a pinching gesture, is the black shaded rectangular text box, showing the Binary Division of Content headline and the options Phone, Music, Yelp, Foursquare, Rec, beneath it. When the man makes the pinching motion, the blue triangle drops down to touch the word “Yelp,” indicating that it has been selected.]

Davide Bolchini: you can move up, you can move back.

[Video: A medium two-shot of Davide Bolchini and Chris Meyer sitting side-by-side in chairs in a windowless office with beige walls. Behind them in the background are two black Dell computer monitors, a green potted plant, and a white dry-erase board covered with green markings.]

Davide Bolchini: So, we call this approach “screenless” navigation, a navigation that operates without a reference screen because we don't need a screen if we don't have to look at it. And so, we remove the screen from the picture and we allow the blind to use simple hand waving, hand gestures, which are also very discreet, to interact with the web service, which is on the cloud, in a much more nimble and fast way.

[Video: Close-up headshot of Chris Meyer sitting in a windowless office with beige walls. Directly behind him is a large green potted plant, behind him and to the left sits a black Dell computer monitor, behind him and to the right is a white dry erase board covered in green markings.]

Chris Meyer: I was really excited when I found out that he had an interest specifically in how do I, as a blind person, experience challenges?

[Video: Close-up headshot of Davide Bolchini, sitting in a windowless office with beige walls. Behind him in the background are two black Dell computer monitors.]

Davide Bolchini: Research in human-computer interaction often starts with experience, and so, the fact that

[Video: A photograph appears on the screen featuring Chris Meyer wearing sunglasses, a white armband on his right forearm. He holds his cell phone in his left hand. The photograph has captured him in the middle of making a hand gesture with his right hand. Davide Bolchini and a female researcher observe nearby. The trio stands in front of a beige wall.]

Davide Bolchini: I had the opportunity to work with Chris, who provides lots of the insight about

[Video: A photograph shows an over-the-shoulder view of the white band on Chris’s right forearm and his phone screen in his left hand. In the background, a female researcher is visible from the neck down and Davide Bolchini is visible from the chest down. Chris and the female researcher both are in the midst of making gestures with their right hands.]

Davide Bolchini: The daily experience really gives

[Video: A photograph appears in which Chris, both arms extended out in front of him, is holding the right hand of a female researcher with his left hand. Another female researcher sits nearby, making notes on a clipboard. Davide Bolchini observes the scene from the background. Next to Davide is an oversized computer monitor.]

Davide Bolchini: a lot of very interesting information

[Video: Close-up headshot of Davide Bolchini, sitting in a windowless office with beige walls. Behind him in the background are two black Dell computer monitors.]

Davide Bolchini: to spring forward the research.

[Video: Close-up headshot of Chris Meyer sitting in a windowless office with beige walls. Directly behind him is a large green potted plant, behind him and to the left sits a black Dell computer monitor, behind him and to the right is a white dry erase board covered in green markings.]

Chris Meyer: The challenge for most blind people I think, that they come to discover is that they don't always have a lot of agency. What my lack of agency had produced is sometimes frustration and with the opportunity of a research project like this,

[Video: A photograph of Davide Bolchini standing in front of two oversized touchscreen monitors, pointing to a diagram containing multiple pink, blue, green, yellow and red rectangles.]

Chris Meyer: I get to put that frustration toward something positive

[Video: A photograph of Davide Bolchini and a female researcher standing in front of a wall of monitors. The female researcher is pointing to an illustration depicting a series of hand gestures.]

Chris Meyer: and I have something

[Video: A photograph depicting Davide lecturing to approximately 12 students in a small classroom setting. Behind him is a wall of monitors displaying a series of cell phones.]

Chris Meyer: that is able to hopefully

[Video: A medium two-shot of Davide Bolchini and Chris Meyer sitting side-by-side in chairs in a windowless office with beige walls. Behind them in the background are two black Dell computer monitors, a green potted plant, and a white dry-erase board covered with green markings.]

Chris Meyer: I mean it could, change the world someday for blind people, and

[Video: Close-up headshot of Chris Meyer sitting in a windowless office with beige walls. Directly behind him is a large green potted plant, behind him and to the left sits a black Dell computer monitor, behind him and to the right is a white dry erase board covered in green markings.]

Chris Meyer: I feel more rewarded. I feel like I've done something with this frustration.

[Words appear: 70 percent of working-age blind adults are unemployed. –National Federation of the Blind]

[Words appear: Chris and Davide’s work has the potential to reduce that number significantly.]

[Video: A medium two-shot of Davide Bolchini and Chris Meyer sitting side-by-side in chairs in a windowless office with beige walls. Behind them in the background are two black Dell computer monitors, a green potted plant, and a white dry-erase board covered with green markings.]

Davide Bolchini: What's interesting about having the possibility to receive private support is that

[Video: Close-up headshot of Davide Bolchini, sitting in a windowless office with beige walls. Behind him in the background are two black Dell computer monitors.]

Davide Bolchini: in many of these areas of accessibility, the market does not go,

[Video: A medium two-shot of Davide Bolchini and Chris Meyer sitting side-by-side in chairs in a windowless office with beige walls. Behind them in the background are two black Dell computer monitors, a green potted plant, and a white dry-erase board covered with green markings.]

Davide Bolchini: But we can go as researchers. And so that's why I think the private support allows you to go in spots, in blind spots, but it allows you to go in spots, in areas of research, which are so advanced that the market does not see now, does not see the business case now,

[Video: Close-up headshot of Davide Bolchini, sitting in a windowless office with beige walls. Behind him in the background are two black Dell computer monitors.]

Davide Bolchini: But that's exactly what research is about, to anticipate where several markets or a new market could go tomorrow.

[Video: A medium two-shot of Davide Bolchini and Chris Meyer sitting side-by-side in chairs in a windowless office with beige walls. Behind them in the background are two black Dell computer monitors, a green potted plant, and a white dry-erase board covered with green markings.]

Chris Meyer: Research, if it's done well, it can change our world someday. And so, helping me to see that what we're doing, it doesn't just have to correct a minor problem today, it could actually stretch out into the future and have all of this impact.

[Video: IU logo and For All: The Indiana University Bicentennial Campaign logo appear.]

[Music ends.]

[End of transcript.]

[Music begins]

[Video: IU Banner appears top center]

[Words Appear: Indiana University Foundation]

[Words Appear: An estimated 10 million Americans are blind or visually impaired. —National Federation of the Blind]

[Words Appear: Their ability to use technology will determine their educational and occupational success.]

[Words Appear: Researchers at Indiana University are meeting this challenge head-on.]

[Video: Close-up headshot of Chris Meyer sitting in a windowless office with beige walls. Directly behind him is a large green potted plant, behind him and to the left sits a black Dell computer monitor, behind him and to the right is a white dry erase board covered in green markings.]

[Words Appear next to an IU banner at the bottom left of the screen: Chris Meyer BS’16; Research Assistant, IU School of Informatics and Computing, IUPUI]

Chris Meyer: The blind and visually impaired across the world have gained a lot from our digital advances,

[Video: An over-the-shoulder close-up photograph of a blonde man wearing noise cancelling headphones and interacting with a white and grey braille keyboard on his desktop. Directly above the braille keyboard is an open black laptop.]

Chris Meyer: and have really enjoyed a lot of opportunities,

[Video: An extreme close-up photograph of a person operating an audio book player for the visually impaired with their left hand.]

Chris Meyer: through the technology that has

[Video: A close-up photograph of a woman gazing through a pair of eyeglasses and into a vision assistance headset, a white visor-like device that protrudes from her forehead.]

[Video: Close-up headshot of Chris Meyer sitting in a windowless office with beige walls. Directly behind him is a large green potted plant, behind him and to the left sits a black Dell computer monitor, behind him and to the right is a white dry erase board covered in green markings.] 

Chris Meyer: turned our world into ones and zeroes, to little pieces of data, but a lot of times the world isn't designed for blind people.

[Video: Close-up headshot of Davide Bolchini, sitting in a windowless office with beige walls. Behind him in the background are two black Dell computer monitors.]

Davide Bolchini: The overall line of research, I like to call it how we can navigate the aural web.

[Words appear next to an IU Banner at the bottom left of the screen: Davide Bolchini, Ph.D.; Chair and Associate Professor, Department of Human-Centered Computing]

Davide Bolchini: So how we can help the blind individual interact with the web in a way which is mainly based on their auditory senses. So, the blind has this outstanding ability

[Video: A photograph of a blonde man in a black t-shirt wearing noise-cancellation headphones sits in a gray-walled cube. On the desk in front of him is a black keyboard attached by a power cable into a closed black laptop.

Davide Bolchini: to listen to text at very high speech rate.

[Video: A medium two-shot of Davide Bolchini and Chris Meyer sitting side-by-side in chairs in a windowless office with beige walls. Behind them in the background are two black Dell computer monitors, a green potted plant, and a white dry-erase board covered with green markings.]

Davide Bolchini: I think Chris can listen to text to up to 400 words per minute, something like that, right?

Chris Meyer: Yeah, around 450.

Davide Bolchini: 450

[Video: A close-up of Davide Bolchini sitting in a windowless office with beige walls. Behind him sit two black Dell computer monitors.]

Davide Bolchini: Which means, it means a lot. When he listens to text, I cannot understand exactly what he listening, but he's actually listening one of my papers maybe, but I really can't tell. So, this outstanding ability's underutilized in navigating web interfaces. Web interfaces, we are still working on the paradigm of

[Video: A medium two-shot of Davide Bolchini and Chris Meyer sitting side-by-side in chairs in a windowless office with beige walls. Behind them in the background are two black Dell computer monitors, a green potted plant, and a white dry-erase board covered with green markings.]

Davide Bolchini: connecting one page to the other.

[Video: An extreme close-up of a man wearing black-rimmed glasses. Reflections from a computer screen move across his lenses.]

Davide Bolchini: It's a very page-by-page navigation.

[Video: Over-the-shoulder close-up shot of a man in a white t-shirt swiping through a series of bar graphs on an iPad.]

Davide Bolchini: But for the blind, the pages do not exist.

[Video: An over-the-shoulder shot of a red-bearded man wearing a red, long-sleeved button-up shirt. He’s sitting in front of a desktop computer monitor, navigating through a social media profile by using a mouse.]

Davide Bolchini: The notion of page is very visual.

[Video: A close-up of Davide Bolchini sitting in a windowless office with beige walls. Behind him sit two black Dell computer monitors.]

Davide Bolchini: And so how we can reconstitute the element of navigation in a website without relying on the notion of page. We have to rely on content, on information, on topics.

[Words appear: Davide and Chris are working together at IU to design solutions for listening-based web navigation…]

[Words appear: …and for “screenless” navigation that will address mobility challenges blind people face every day.]

[Video: A medium two-shot of Davide Bolchini and Chris Meyer sitting side-by-side in chairs in a windowless office with beige walls. Behind them in the background are two black Dell computer monitors, a green potted plant, and a white dry-erase board covered with green markings.]

Davide Bolchini: Imagine, so the scenario, which, instead of having to take out your phone, stop what you are doing, and searching for the bus stop, or searching for things you have to go buy at the grocery, you keep your phone in your pocket, you still have your cane, and you start navigating using simple hand gestures.

[Video: Exterior view of a brown brick building. A young man with a goatee wearing a purple shirt and jeans walks toward the camera. He has ear buds in his ears that connect to a device in his pocket. On his right forearm is a black band. The words “Binary Division of Content” appear in a black shaded rectangle to the left of the man. Beneath the words “Binary Division of Content” are five smaller words: Calendar, Book, Phone, Music and Yelp. A blue triangle hovers over the word “phone.” The man makes a gesture with his right hand toward the onscreen text. The blue triangle moves from Phone to Music to Yelp.]

Davide Bolchini: You can navigate forward, backward, you can select

[Video: Cut to a close-up of the black band on the man’s forearm. Laid over his hand, which is making a pinching gesture, is the black shaded rectangular text box, showing the Binary Division of Content headline and the options Phone, Music, Yelp, Foursquare, Rec, beneath it. When the man makes the pinching motion, the blue triangle drops down to touch the word “Yelp,” indicating that it has been selected.]

Davide Bolchini: you can move up, you can move back.

[Video: A medium two-shot of Davide Bolchini and Chris Meyer sitting side-by-side in chairs in a windowless office with beige walls. Behind them in the background are two black Dell computer monitors, a green potted plant, and a white dry-erase board covered with green markings.]

Davide Bolchini: So, we call this approach “screenless” navigation, a navigation that operates without a reference screen because we don't need a screen if we don't have to look at it. And so, we remove the screen from the picture and we allow the blind to use simple hand waving, hand gestures, which are also very discreet, to interact with the web service, which is on the cloud, in a much more nimble and fast way.

[Video: Close-up headshot of Chris Meyer sitting in a windowless office with beige walls. Directly behind him is a large green potted plant, behind him and to the left sits a black Dell computer monitor, behind him and to the right is a white dry erase board covered in green markings.] 

Chris Meyer: I was really excited when I found out that he had an interest specifically in how do I, as a blind person, experience challenges?

[Video: Close-up headshot of Davide Bolchini, sitting in a windowless office with beige walls. Behind him in the background are two black Dell computer monitors.]

Davide Bolchini: Research in human-computer interaction often starts with experience, and so, the fact that

[Video: A photograph appears on the screen featuring Chris Meyer wearing sunglasses, a white armband on his right forearm. He holds his cell phone in his left hand. The photograph has captured him in the middle of making a hand gesture with his right hand. Davide Bolchini and a female researcher observe nearby. The trio stands in front of a beige wall.]

Davide Bolchini: I had the opportunity to work with Chris, who provides lots of the insight about

[Video: A photograph shows an over-the-shoulder view of the white band on Chris’s right forearm and his phone screen in his left hand. In the background, a female researcher is visible from the neck down and Davide Bolchini is visible from the chest down. Chris and the female researcher both are in the midst of making gestures with their right hands.]

Davide Bolchini: The daily experience really gives

[Video: A photograph appears in which Chris, both arms extended out in front of him, is holding the right hand of a female researcher with his left hand. Another female researcher sits nearby, making notes on a clipboard. Davide Bolchini observes the scene from the background. Next to Davide is an oversized computer monitor.]

Davide Bolchini: a lot of very interesting information

[Video: Close-up headshot of Davide Bolchini, sitting in a windowless office with beige walls. Behind him in the background are two black Dell computer monitors.]

Davide Bolchini: to spring forward the research.

[Video: Close-up headshot of Chris Meyer sitting in a windowless office with beige walls. Directly behind him is a large green potted plant, behind him and to the left sits a black Dell computer monitor, behind him and to the right is a white dry erase board covered in green markings.] 

Chris Meyer: The challenge for most blind people I think, that they come to discover is that they don't always have a lot of agency. What my lack of agency had produced is sometimes frustration and with the opportunity of a research project like this,

[Video: A photograph of Davide Bolchini standing in front of two oversized touchscreen monitors, pointing to a diagram containing multiple pink, blue, green, yellow and red rectangles.]

Chris Meyer: I get to put that frustration toward something positive

[Video: A photograph of Davide Bolchini and a female researcher standing in front of a wall of monitors. The female researcher is pointing to an illustration depicting a series of hand gestures.]

Chris Meyer: and I have something

[Video: A photograph depicting Davide lecturing to approximately 12 students in a small classroom setting. Behind him is a wall of monitors displaying a series of cell phones.]

Chris Meyer: that is able to hopefully

[Video: A medium two-shot of Davide Bolchini and Chris Meyer sitting side-by-side in chairs in a windowless office with beige walls. Behind them in the background are two black Dell computer monitors, a green potted plant, and a white dry-erase board covered with green markings.]

Chris Meyer: I mean it could, change the world someday for blind people, and

[Video: Close-up headshot of Chris Meyer sitting in a windowless office with beige walls. Directly behind him is a large green potted plant, behind him and to the left sits a black Dell computer monitor, behind him and to the right is a white dry erase board covered in green markings.] 

Chris Meyer: I feel more rewarded. I feel like I've done something with this frustration.

[Words appear: 70 percent of working-age blind adults are unemployed. –National Federation of the Blind]

[Words appear: Chris and Davide’s work has the potential to reduce that number significantly.]

[Video: A medium two-shot of Davide Bolchini and Chris Meyer sitting side-by-side in chairs in a windowless office with beige walls. Behind them in the background are two black Dell computer monitors, a green potted plant, and a white dry-erase board covered with green markings.]

Davide Bolchini: What's interesting about having the possibility to receive private support is that

[Video: Close-up headshot of Davide Bolchini, sitting in a windowless office with beige walls. Behind him in the background are two black Dell computer monitors.]

Davide Bolchini: in many of these areas of accessibility, the market does not go,

[Video: A medium two-shot of Davide Bolchini and Chris Meyer sitting side-by-side in chairs in a windowless office with beige walls. Behind them in the background are two black Dell computer monitors, a green potted plant, and a white dry-erase board covered with green markings.]

Davide Bolchini: But we can go as researchers. And so that's why I think the private support allows you to go in spots, in blind spots, but it allows you to go in spots, in areas of research, which are so advanced that the market does not see now, does not see the business case now,

[Video: Close-up headshot of Davide Bolchini, sitting in a windowless office with beige walls. Behind him in the background are two black Dell computer monitors.]

Davide Bolchini: But that's exactly what research is about, to anticipate where several markets or a new market could go tomorrow.

[Video: A medium two-shot of Davide Bolchini and Chris Meyer sitting side-by-side in chairs in a windowless office with beige walls. Behind them in the background are two black Dell computer monitors, a green potted plant, and a white dry-erase board covered with green markings.]

Chris Meyer: Research, if it's done well, it can change our world someday. And so, helping me to see that what we're doing, it doesn't just have to correct a minor problem today, it could actually stretch out into the future and have all of this impact.

[Video: IU logo and For All: The Indiana University Bicentennial Campaign logo appear.]

[Music ends.]

[End of transcript.]

Can your car run on baked beans? We’re trying to find out.

At the Lugar Center for Renewable Energy at IUPUI, we’re addressing society’s needs for clean, affordable energy sources. In this collaborative environment, students, faculty, and external organizations are exploring innovative ideas—like obtaining power from municipal solid waste, hydraulic wind turbines, and agricultural biomass. (According to the center’s director, baked beans “trounced” baked potatoes in their ability to power fuel cells.)

With your support, we can continue to seek sustainable clean energy solutions that will leave a better world for generations to come.

For the next generation of learners

What do kids learn in the process of creating? How can we leverage their interest in digital culture and design to improve their performance in math and science? And what if educators could transform the classroom learning experience so that children are not only using technology but creating their own devices?

These are just a few of the questions that IU School of Education Associate Professor Kylie Peppler is exploring. Named the 2016 Mira Tech Educator of the Year, Peppler is emerging as a leader in the Maker Education Movement, which emphasizes creativity, curiosity, and hands-on learning.

Currently, she’s exploring the similarities between games and playground-like dynamics and the methods used in more advanced forms of scientific study—with the goal of helping students develop their skills in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM).

Research like Dr. Peppler’s is revolutionizing the way children learn—and expanding the possibilities for their future. With your support, she can continue to pursue innovative ideas and train the next generation of teachers.

Join us as we create a brighter future for all

For more information on how you can help fuel life-changing ideas and innovation, contact Jeffrey Lindauer, Vice President for Advancement Services and Managing Director of Capital Campaigns, at jlindaue@indiana.edu or 812-855-4567.